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Whats is JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group)?

The JPEG file format is the undisputed king of file formats for photographic images. It is a compressed file format. With JPEG you can generally achieve a file size a 1/10th the size of an equivalent TIFF file without a noticeable loss of quality.


The higher the quality – you set this in percentages or in steps (high, normal, low) – the more detail is retained in the image, but the file size is larger, and it therefore takes longer to load. If you use a quality setting of 60 percent, it means that the image has been compressed 40 percent. When you save a JPEG file you must make a compromise between image quality and image file size.


The catch is that the more you compress an image, the worse the quality, which is why most professional photographers choose to work exclusively in an uncompressed file format so as not to compromise the quality of their work. However, for most jobs the JPEG format

is an excellent option if you are shooting lots. With the right setting you can achieve excellent results, but overall, the RAW format is better. Some high-end digital cameras could simultaneously produce a RAW and JPEG file, which is useful if you want to quickly preview your images as JPEGs are quicker to access and view than RAW, since they don’t have to go through a RAW converter first.


Storage cards


If you are a studio-based photographer, you may not need a storage card in your camera. Instead, you can connect your camera directly to a computer and download the photographs as you take them. On some cameras you can even transfer your photographs wirelessly, increasing your mobility around the studio or on location.


In any other scenario you need a memory card in your camera. Most digital cameras are sold with a storage card. These are usually of questionable quality and very small (the standard size seems to be around 32 MB). It is highly recommended that you invest in two more cards. This provides more storage space, and one can act as a back-up in case the other corrupts or stops working.

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